Why didn't ISIS attack China or Russia?

  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: If the "secular" governments had not committed mass murder of their own people at regular intervals, they would be worthy of support. In addition, these states are neither secular nor were they, according to the constitution, the head of state of Syria must be a Muslim, and Saddam made a turn to Islamism in the 90s, which was accompanied by a campaign in which thousands of women were beheaded for prostitution.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Well, a lot of Hamas equipment comes from Iran, whose sector also makes good money from it.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: And an incorporation of Gaza and Wesjordan into Egypt and Jordan.

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  • Machiavelli

    I think Azerbaijan wants to take over the Zod Gold Mine, this would be the death knell for Armenia as it would dry up an important source of income, together with the costs for tens of thousands of refugees, widows, orphans and disabled people from the last war, this would mean the financial collapse of Armenia . But Azerbaijan can only stop Russia, the Armenian army no longer exists as a factor.

    The basic problem with Macron's statement here is that he has no leverage, nothing can be achieved without pressure on Azerbaijan, but the Germans (and their Azerbaijan representatives of the Union) would not even intervene if Armenia were to go under and a new genocide threatened. Out of sight, out of mind and leave us alone is the German mentality when it comes to problems elsewhere.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: "It will always be cheaper than the current remunicipalisation policy, in which municipal housing companies buy back apartments that were sold to private investors in the noughties at ridiculous prices at market prices." I doubt that because the court would then also take into account the effects on Germany as a whole in terms of attractiveness for investors and interest on national debt will have to be paid above market price (because it is forced) for the apartments.

    Why not build apartments on Tempelhofer Feld with the money and where else there is space?

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: This regulation would cost Germany quite dearly, which is why Germany is against it.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: I will do it wherever possible, but you have to say that many other companies have very poor service in terms of delivery times, customer service, etc.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: For Berlin or Germany?

    They cannot enact something like that for Berlin.

    For Germany only for non-EU citizens, but most of those who come because they are needed in the care sector and industry.

    If the refugees stay, they can be turned away at the border, but I don't think that's what they mean (although there would be a good solution here as well, the costs for accommodation, food and training and integration in Italy, Greece, Jordan, Turkey are covered etc.) then rejection is not a moral problem.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: The Syrian army has not been a threat since the mid-1990s, poorly equipped and motivated troops.

    Today she is completely worn out and is only kept alive by Russian and Iranian mercenaries.

    The Israelis regularly smash the infrastructure that the Iranians are building. If they wanted, they could completely disarm the Syrian state within a few weeks, but Syria under Assad stands for stability from the perspective of Israel.

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  • Machiavelli

    Abolish all these civil economic partnerships, all those who do in the Bundeswehr should be in the Bundeswehr.

    Then an independent body that checks the loyalty to the constitution.

    Actually not part of the topic, but if you are already at it, the procurement of equipment is transferred to the troops who then buy what works and not what is politically opportune because you want to abuse the Bundeswehr for industrial policy.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: These are the flags of the Syrian Republic 1930-1958 used by the Syrian opposition with green bars instead of red and three stars instead of two, Assad's Syria is officially called the Syrian Arab Republic.

    Are probably (former) refugees from Syria demonstrating with it.

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  • Machiavelli

    “The compensation is to be determined with fair consideration of the interests of the general public and those involved.” But that would also mean taking into account the consequences for the entire Federal Republic of Germany, among other things, the willingness to invest in Germany and interest rates for the federal and state governments could increase considerably , because a government expropriations that are below market value also likes not to pay back its debts. With all these aspects in mind, I assume a sum over market value of 150-200%.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: For data protection reasons, data must be regularly deleted, ie your suggestion would not work, bodycam footage shows many uninvolved people, etc. More important would be a solid IT structure where data can be restored, where there are clear logs that prove who did what and when Has.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Okay, so ammunition is not cheap. Bombs and missiles cost a lot of money because they don't just fire into the blue. Israel also wants to achieve something. They use satellites, drones and intelligence to hit Hamas launchers, weapons caches and communications facilities. The problem is that they are often located next to or directly in civilian facilities, weapons are stored in schools, hospitals and mosques, rockets are fired from civilians' gardens, etc.

    And the military staff do not care, Hamas fires rockets that gives Israel the right to strike back so that there is no further threat.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Well, there are bombs and rockets in all calibers and sizes, from those that wipe out cities to those that are fired at cars without explosives and armed with blades so as not to endanger bystanders. Since civilian victims are bad for Israel, they are calibrated very well, and the attacks also include those with helicopters who use their cannons and machine guns, with which you can, for example, destroy launch pads without causing much damage.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: He can inquire about that, but the NATO majority would not stand behind him, it would be much more dangerous for Turkey to leave NATO and for an alliance between Turkey and Russia, this would massively exacerbate Europe's conventional threats.

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  • Machiavelli

    Why is it getting so much attention? Ignore him, let him do his thing and be good. There are so many green politicians who have something clever to say and who gets at least 50% of the attention of a trolling small town mayor.

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  • Machiavelli

    "Kiev feels threatened by Russia."

    Russia has occupied parts of Ukraine, Duma deputies deny Ukraine statehood and in some cases it is threatened with nuclear weapons. Russia threatens Ukraine, that's not a feeling, that's a fact.

    Also, it would be better to speak of Kiev and Moscow or Ukraine and Russia.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: There is hardly a country that does more for its citizens than Germany.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Those who can produce just mRNA vaccine cannot be produced everywhere, but if there is capacity, companies like Astra, etc. take it too.

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  • Machiavelli

    I am in favor of the rich countries buying the patent and then making it available for free, so the pharmaceutical industry becomes less attractive for investors, which in the medium term leads to less research etc.

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  • Machiavelli

    "Fat people, the myth goes, have thicker skin. You can tackle them harder. They can take it."

    To this day, it would not have occurred to me to associate thick skin with being overweight, but rather with hard work.

    "To reject the civil service of people with a BMI over 30 across the board, there are always cases in which such applications were only approved through legal proceedings. Some insurances, such as the one for occupational disability, are only available for fat people for a risk surcharge or sometimes even Not."

    Quite simply, being overweight is a health risk factor, there are also other cases where people are not civil servants or have problems with disability insurance. This is not an unjustified discrimination but an analysis, if there is a significantly increased chance that a civil servant will be absent for health reasons before retirement he / she / div. not civil servants.

    The insurance companies do a very simple cost calculation, many non-overweight people have the same problem.

    "The so-called fat tax is also due when buying clothes: fat people pay the surcharge not only when booking an airplane seat, but also when shopping. Apart from the fact that not all clothing is available in all sizes, it often costs more . "

    If I need more space I have to pay for more space, if I need more fabric I have to pay for more fabric. Relatively simple.

    There's no question about fat-shaming, but these examples are really badly chosen.

    Obesity is unhealthy and you should approach 15 minutes of exercise a day and a healthier diet is feasible for everyone.

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  • Machiavelli

  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: This council is called the Bundestag and every citizen can vote and even have himself elected.

    How would their advice be put together? After class? Religion? Skin color? There are so many factors that make up a person, some of which overlap, that such an approach does not work.

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  • Machiavelli

    I think it was foreseeable that the verdict would not last. That will result in manslaughter or serious bodily harm resulting in death.

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  • Machiavelli

    You can do it and instead of Hartz4 there is a dry body of bread once a quarter without the automotive industry. Joking aside, e-cars are not the future, but hydrogen, which can be produced in Africa with solar kiosks and consumed in Europe. That would also solve the problem that most oil exporting countries have that they are so dependent on. Instead, Saudis, Russians, etc. then generate hydrogen from the sun or wind energy. Hydrogen would also mean combustion engines have a future and are easier to integrate into existing infrastructure.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: But what happens to me in BaWü, too, is tragic what is supposed to convey humanistic education to personnel.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Any consideration in such a format is sub-complex, do you mean that its execution was an excursus in complexity?

    For example, we do not yet have military-industrial complexes on both sides and their role in the current conflict.

    The different definitions of when a definition of an enemy is rationally justified and when is ideologically justified, etc.

    The Germans are definitely not the good ones (I never said) the last when it comes to standing up for democracy and human rights and the first when it comes to doing business with criminal regimes. There is no such thing as good and bad in politics, there are only interests.

    I believe democracy and authoritarianism cannot coexist peacefully, in the long term they will come into conflict because the existence of the other is needed as the external enemy, but is always a danger.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: In my school lessons, only a few years ago, there was Stone Age, Athens vs. Sparta, the Middle Ages and then from 8th grade to high school only Nazis their rise and their crimes, even got my oral exam about the fall of the Weimar Republic held (voluntary, on the topic you knew your way around). So I think it's not because of the lack of history lessons with young politicians.

    The young politicians may speak of a "clear edge" because the lesson is not that Germany was the problem, but the ideology. And that massive nationalism (with massive military parades), militarism (T-14, main church of the armed forces of Russia) and claims to other countries (New Russia) can be found today not in the Bundestag but in the Duma.

    The 8./9. May was a defeat and a day of liberation, militarily defeated, but liberated from the regime, that the regime also consisted of many millions of people - the Germans were displaced by the Germans who were gassed / shot, who built weapons and signed war bonds.

    In addition, I think throwing them together is a little evil no German politician is talking about a new campaign in the East, it is about being able to support allies (who were also victims at the time) in case of doubt against an authoritarian system that does not shy away from murder and invasion, which is fundamentally different from the habitat ideologies of that time.

    There are also few who have the Russian people as an enemy, except on the far right.

    The enemy is called Putin, the enemy is called Xi Xinping, Ayatollah Khamenei and what they are all called who oppress and exploit their peoples, but they are only the bandits who have made themselves comfortable on the leadership chairs of their respective countries and not the peoples ..

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: They are still waiting for instructions on how to defame this young man.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Only if you keep growing, but to stop climate change we have to shrink, then government debt is fatal. Because when interest rates rise, Germany has zero financial leeway. The federal government is already giving away billions for interest.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Even without the stored tanks, Russia has enough tanks to sweep aside everything that NATO has in Eastern Europe or can quickly get there.

    It is true that the Russian Air Force has weakened there, but the rearmament machine is also running here and Russia has massively built up your air defense capabilities. How much ammunition there is in Europe for the aircraft is questionable. I think that would not be enough for the second and third wave of attacks. In Libya, the Europeans ran out of ammunition after a few days.

    When it comes to artillery and attack helicopters, Russia is at least naturally superior.

    In addition, a tank is not primarily used to fight other tanks, but other vehicles and infantry.

    Ultimately, you have to look at the entire armed forces because they are right, Russia has significantly more experience when it comes to deploying large units, better land forces inferior at sea and air. Possible that the west could win here, I think it would lose at the moment. I hope we never find out.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: The Chinese armed people's police have armored personnel carriers that is a militia that makes sense to include them at least partially, you could also do in Italy.

    The basic problem is this because of economic and structural differences, it makes no sense to compare the budgets.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: It is, but you can't defend freedom and democracy without power.

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  • Machiavelli

    It is time for decoupling, Germany and the EU must become more independent. China's authoritarian rulers obviously have no interest in changing, so it is now no longer necessary to strengthen China's economic growth but to develop other markets and transform NATO into an alliance of democracies without Turkey but with Japan and Taiwan.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: You don't need enemies with Turkey as an ally, that's true, but throwing it out of NATO wouldn't improve the situation either - it's one of the largest armies in the world.

    Russia makes the smarter the occupying country and then make claims.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: T-72s are no scrap, most Russian T-72s are upgraded, all have a 125mm cannon and can take on western tanks.

    There are no warehouses in Germany because the federal government wanted to save storage and maintenance costs in the rest of Europe.

    PS: My mistake, turning numbers in my head.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: We have duties of assistance not only within NATO but also within the EU.

    The EU should be able to defend itself against any attack without the USA and Germany should make a contribution to it commensurate with its economic performance and population, nothing more.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: These are all active (about 3000) and stored tanks (about 10,000), most of them are T-72s of different models (about 7000). This is also an advantage of Russia that has stocks of weapons that gives the army the opportunity to grow quickly in the event of a conflict and that Germany has sold its stocks.

    In 1941 the Soviet Union had around 20,000 tanks, mainly BT-1 and T-26.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: There are various sources on this, SIPRI itself states that this has to be taken into account, but it is difficult to estimate precisely, which is why they do not give any figures. The fact is that Russia buys significantly more purchasing power for its budget than the West.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Germany has high wages and since the 1990s the Bundeswehr has massively reduced capabilities that are now missing anti-aircraft tanks, artillery, etc. There were also a lot of reforms that were supposed to transform Germany into an operational army, but now national defense is announced again.

    Therefore Germany is already under armored, you just have to look at how many artillery, tanks etc. Germany has and then look at how many tanks etc. Russia has, with the T-14 they also have a tank that is superior to all western models.

    The Bundeswehr has no antidote or equivalent against Turkish drones.

    The general population will notice the deficiencies in the Bundeswehr when it comes to the next war and then suddenly the losses are in the hundreds and thousands, like with the Corona crisis, you only notice what is missing when it's too late, or you stop the experts.

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  • Machiavelli

    What I am missing is a clear security policy concept, but not against armed drones for missions abroad. You can't be a transatlantic and a pacifist or a pro-Russian pseudo-pacifist at the same time, and I don't get enough of the Greens to thoroughly discuss and explain things.

    If you send soldiers to crisis regions you need close air support and armed drones do that best.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: The core problem of the Bundeswehr is that it is not clear what to do. Should it be a light, rapid intervention army or should it provide conventional national defense against Russian and possibly Turkish attacks on Europe?

    In Germany there is no real culture of debate about national interests, strategy and doctrine and so many resources are wasted.

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  • Machiavelli

    Three things should already be mentioned:

    These three countries have the USA as a protective power, so it simply lives as a country without an army, Iceland also maintains an armed coast guard.

    The problem with the SIPRI report does not take the purchasing power into account (Purchasing-Power.Parity), if you factor that in, you get a Chinese budget of 444 billion, the Russian one of 161 billion.

    In addition, these are only estimates for China and Russia because military expenditure: coast guards, armed police, etc. do not appear in the defense budget and can therefore only be estimated by SIPRI.

    It would be important that there is an alternative to SIPRI that looks at capabilities in the sense that combat-ready units with modern equipment are counted. Germany spends a lot of money, but in such a comparison it would look pretty beaten. Ultimately, such an analysis would also be important for disarmament and peace policy; war is ultimately waged with weapons and soldiers and not with money.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Germany is withdrawing from nuclear energy production and not from using nuclear energy. As long as neighboring countries use atomic energy, it makes no sense to get out, under the aspect of security, at least.

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  • Machiavelli

    Some things should be noted:

    1. There is no threat to Russia from NATO, Russia has nuclear weapons and a powerful army, there is neither the ability (already fails because of the logistics) nor the desire to invade Russia, for what? You buy resources cheaper. The NATO threat is a propaganda fiction of Putin and the Russian military-industrial complex.

    2. Russia has no right to hide in the Ukraine, the protection of the Russian minority is a particularly hypocritical argument, since in the occupied territories Russian is declared the only permitted language, so it is discriminated against. Russia's claim to Crimea is just as great as Germany's claim to Gdansk, Alsace-Lorraine or Luxembourg.

    3. Russia broke the treaty, not NATO. Russia has guaranteed the sovereignty of Ukraine together with the West in return the 3rd largest nuclear power (!) Has given up its nuclear weapons. So the West actually has a duty of assistance. There is no treaty not to expand NATO to the east, but Russia can also be irrelevant see point 1.

    4. Ukraine's accession to NATO was actually not an option until 2014, it was about an EU accession perspective, which is even more dangerous for Putin because then the Russians would learn via Ukraine that things can be better economically and politically. A NATO membership would probably have even led to the disarmament of Ukraine.

    5. China is the bigger threat globally, but that doesn't make Russia any less dangerous, as it has shown that it is willing and able to invade other countries. If Russia wants to be an ally against Chinese authoritarianism, the path is quite simple, return of the Crimea, withdrawal from eastern Ukraine and then democratic reforms and EU and NATO association.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Russia regularly sends ships to Cuba - that's not unusual.

    The NATO maneuver includes 1/5 of the troops that Russia has drawn together and takes place regularly, Russia has similarly large maneuvers without what NATO says. But this looks more like a march just before a war.

    To pursue a policy of détente while Putin is threatening the sovereignty and trinity of Ukraine is a betrayal of peace and democracy.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: The peoples of the post-Soviet space have a right to self-determination, a policy of détente at the expense of third parties is called apeasement.

    If China wants to leave their allies alone, they should leave Vietnam, Taiwan, Japan, Philippines, India, Bhutan alone.

    The Baltic states also belong to the post-Soviet area. Would you like to kick them out of NATO and the EU just to put Putin in a mild mood?

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: It should be there so that you can be there and politicians can be invited to meetings and feel important. She should actually do as little as possible.

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  • Machiavelli

    Laschet will not be Chancellor, unless he comes around the corner tomorrow with the best Union program in the history of the FRG, he will not be Chancellor, Söder would have led the Union over 30%, Laschet can be happy if he manages 20%.

    The problem is that too many Union voters will vote for AFD and the Greens will probably argue a lot between the left wing who brings in 5% and who then bring in 20% plus who has the say.

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  • Machiavelli

  • Machiavelli

    There are more than 80 million people and a few hundred wolves in Germany, putting people above everything is the basis of so much environmental destruction.

    The wolf is native to Germany, how can you convince countries like Indonesia, Brazil etc. to protect their forests and animals when we are doing such a drama about a few wolves. The biosphere is the basis of life and it needs biodiversity. If the wolf causes problems, you have to find solutions: fences, depopulate areas so that nature has peace. When in doubt, wild boars also injure and kill people directly or indirectly and there is no outcry. If wolves kill more people than dogs we can see a discussion relaxed until then. A little fear of nature doesn't do any harm.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: No, it doesn't. The majority of Germans are not aware of the scope of these issues or they are not interested, most of them choose short-term thinking with their wallet in mind. Foreign policy is too complicated and inconvenient for most Germans - ostrich tactics, so politicians not talking about the issues they are talking about could unsettle the population.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Whose forces are distributed over the world, what kind of forces are realistically available for the defense of Eastern Europe? Do you think China, Iran etc. are waiting to see if NATO defeats its ally Russia? If it comes to a war, the Europeans will have to defend themselves and that looks bad.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: NATO can only enter Russia if it can endanger Russia, but there is no conventional threat to Russia from NATO. NATO's eastward expansion saved the Balts from a fate like that of Ukraine.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Well they presented evidence and motive, what do they have?

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  • Machiavelli

    As a sign of solidarity, you could thread a few sponsored arms deals, Ukraine would get tanks from Germany at a reduced rate from the French, wheeled armored vehicles, etc. Saudi Arabia subsidized by national debt that the ECB buys, is not noticeable in the whole Corona aid measures anyway. Ukraine can then store older Soviet equipment for this purpose.

    Ukraine solemnly promises to use the whole thing only for defense. That would show Russia that you mean business without risking blood, until the stuff is delivered anyway, it would take a few years into the country and you would have something to negotiate, the weapons will not be delivered if Russia withdraws its troops again and in the country Eastern Ukraine meets substantially.

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  • Machiavelli

    Seems that Wagner learned from the battle of Khasham and now also uses airplanes, whereby the Mig-21 is quite old, now the question is the old Libyan Migs that have been used more often or are the Migs from Wagner or even Migs from Russia Remnants flown by pilots of the Russian Air Force?

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: The Ukrainian army has been massively strengthened in recent years by volunteers and militias, it is possible that the rules were relaxed. She can still shoot that way and longer fingernails are not without it in close combat.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Primarily for the welfare state, education, pension system, roads and other infrastructure, hospitals etc. I am actually very happy that the state does not offer apartments for free, either the quality would be underground or other more important services would be limited.

    The state should simply build more apartments, then prices fall automatically, people have to become less demanding in terms of size and location.

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  • Machiavelli

    The court has done its job, the Germans have so much confidence in their constitutional court because they do not allow themselves to be carried away into such political games.

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  • Machiavelli

    I think that will weaken the chances of the expropriation vote, if the city government doesn’t get it right, how are they supposed to manage a much bigger thing then?

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: So because NATO is carrying out a naval maneuver (with forces that are clearly inferior to the Russian Black Sea Fleet) Russia is pulling together large troops on the border?

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Russia has torpedoed all attempts at a nuclear-weapon-free world with it, I'm pretty sure in 20 years the Baltic, Poles and Ukrainians will have acquired nuclear weapons together, Iranians, Turks, Saudis too and Japan together with Taiwan probably too. The only guarantee against it to be swallowed up by great powers.

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  • Machiavelli

    "Laschet was attested to bringing together opinions, developing an attitude and representing them consistently"

    Yes, because the man has no opinion of his own except economy, economy and again economy, regardless of whether it is about China, the climate or Russia and attitude and Laschet should not appear in one sentence.

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  • Machiavelli

    Left parties have always suffered from the fact that they mainly consist of intellectuals with socio-political left views, but who often come from the middle or even upper class. And are elected by people from the lower class who are often socio-politically conservative and above all want to improve their own situation. Or to put it more simply, they don't dream of the absolutely same society with open borders, green economy and gender equality, but of being able to live like the middle class with Benz and 2-3 vacations abroad a year. This contradiction can only be successfully resolved by uniting both sides, the lower class and the socially progressive middle class, that is the recipe for success as a left-wing party gets over 30%. Sarah Wagenknecht, on the other hand, wants to get rid of the intellectuals and their middle-class voters and concentrate entirely on the lower-class voters. That probably leads. 10% but then the potential is exhausted.

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  • Machiavelli

    The problems are already well described, but ultimately this is clientele policy for those who are there. The basic problem is a lack of living space, which makes it possible to drive up prices because you can always find someone who pays (although there is a shortage in a desirable location, you can still find apartments in Berlin for every budget).

    This problem does not concern this solution at all, rather it even exacerbates it because the expropriation should not be super worthwhile for the expropriated, but this leads to the fact that new apartments are less likely to be built.

    The hope that the state housing company will then build large apartments is problematic.

    The rents should then be low and if the current operators are really that bad, it can be assumed that there will be a lot of maintenance and renovation costs. In addition, in the next few years, environmental regulations will certainly be tightened again for existing apartments, i.e. there will be new costs. Any rent increase even to compensate for inflation will become a battle between civil servants and nude visits, as well as throwing out people who do not pay their rent. The apartments will bring in a very small profit, if anything, rather a loss.

    This means that politics has been made at the expense of the long-established ones at the expense of everyone who is new, because they are now allowed to rent an apartment and the toilet brush for 1000 € extra (but is only rented together) from the rest of the free market. Everyone who has a state apartment will ensure that he keeps it or keeps it with families and friends.

    Why not take the money for the expropriation and build state apartments?

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  • Machiavelli

    Well, is someone racist who hands out against everyone?

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  • Machiavelli

    I thought we should avoid such aggressive language? Peace policy, change through rapprochement or something, that is what it would have been like if he had said something similar about Putin. Both are dictators.

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  • Machiavelli

    Turkey has 3 advantages:

    - The EU knows that it will not survive another refugee crisis, so Turkey has a massive opportunity to apply pressure here, for this reason it is also involved in Libya, among other things, because if Turkey controls the refugee routes from there it can absolutely dominate Europe politically.

    - Europe is afraid that Turkey will move militarily with its large army to the Russian camp. This would require massive exposure of the defense spending of the satiated northern Europeans.

    - You need the sales markets of Turkey, Europe's economy is down, millions of new retirees come every year without enough new young workers to move up, so the state is desperately looking for everything that somehow generates a little more tax revenue without frightening companies and citizens with new taxes.

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  • Machiavelli

    Nobody really wants to convert the EU into a financial transfer union because that would be legal and legitimize only if all states give up sovereignty and the EU Parliament becomes one-man-one-vote and is massively strengthened and tax standards are aligned. You don't want that, so you circumvent contracts by outsourcing it to the ECB or breaking them directly.

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  • Machiavelli

    The core problem is that France is still (indirectly) a colonial power, like every colonial power it therefore needs an ideology that legitimizes its own role. This can be seen in nationalism, the exaggeration of one's own history and a deep-seated nationalistic mood, that goes as far as to oppose a 2 euro commemorative coin for the Battle of Waterloo through Belgium or to demand the renaming of the Waterloo station in London.

    As long as the continued colonialism and the entire nationalism are not called into question, FN can continue to score points as the most extreme representative of a basic mood.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: Absolutely that the politicians are not ashamed.

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  • Machiavelli

    Where are the historical examples that show the success of negotiations and public pressure? Hasn't that been tried for the past few decades? You have to show China painful consequences (e.g. recognition + guarantee for Taiwan), etc.

    Ultimately, however, all ideas that one could come to terms with China in the long term are an illusion as long as there is still a democracy, the dictators can never be sure of their power, after all, that could inspire their own citizens. Hence, dictatorships will always work to destroy democracy and democrats will have to work to overthrow dictators if they want to survive. We should not refuse this knowledge out of greed or cowardice.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: The rebels who were armed by Russia (they have equipment that Ukraine does not have) under the leadership of Russian officers proudly posted on social media that a Ukrainian van was shot down that day and deleted the relevant posts later when it was clear what shot them down. The rebels = Russia.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: NATO did not go to war with Russia after Russian troops murdered more than 200 EU citizens in an illegal war in eastern Ukraine when the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down, if Russia is provoked by this factually correct ascription to wage war wanted Russia to go to war and was just looking for an excuse.

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  • Machiavelli

    [Re]: That would not be justizable as correct. Putin has given orders to kill people, it wouldn't even be wrong to call Putin a war criminal.

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  • Machiavelli

    D66 is flashing left and turning right; that was a complete triumph for the Conservatives. The volt is also because they have been able to attract people who are concerned about climate change and see nuclear energy as part of the solution and to whom the Greens are on the left in foreign policy.

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    The greatest enemy of left wingers are leftists to their right, as seen most blatantly in the Spanish Civil War, where it was more important to liquidate the Trotskysts or, in the days of May, the anarchists. Some would rather have a hard-right government than cooperate with the Social Democrats. But whoever thinks like this is not about the people, it is primarily about the hatred of the political opponent.

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    Dirty Harry is called that because he hates everyone, he's not a racist, he's a misanthropist.

    Sure he's a brutal cop, but when the criminals are already shooting, as at the beginning of the first part, a circle of chairs doesn't help.

    Ultimately, the film subtly set about tackling prejudices: the first is about a Hispanic colleague, the second is about cops' vigilante justice, part 3 is about a partner and this is about an important debate about gender equality policy Harry is against his new one Partner because she is inexperienced, and that is a current issue in the USA today, inexperienced and poorly trained police officers who are sent to the most problematic areas.

    Clint Eastwood's films always had more subtlety than many would admit, especially if these elements are interpreted correctly, modern action films could certainly open up a new audience for a critical handling of prejudice.

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    It would be interesting to know how the numbers are in other countries and what can be learned from them, are the numbers lower in Sweden and if so, what do they do differently?

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    [Re]: Yes and a land war in Myanmar against the Chinese army cannot be won by the soft Europeans and China is not too important as a trading partner for that. In addition, war is bad and dictatorships are actually quite good, at least so that you don't overthrow them with war, the Germans prefer to watch and hope that they will just go away.

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    Explicitly driving on green-red-red would mean that all three parties together would probably be. 30% would come. The Greens have been strong since their conservative swing and they will do the devil to give this up now. The SPD can neither without its left wing nor without its right wing, the only hope they have is Merkel politics without Merkel but that will be difficult. The left party serves the left fundamental opposition and does not have two digits in the federal government. FDP has survived in the federal government and the AFD .... well, Germany does not survive a fourth Reich.

    The Union wants to stay in power, why doesn't it know anything about media and jobs and lobbying?

    In the big questions that will directly affect the citizens of the next 4 years (digitization, the rise of China and a bureaucracy worthy of the 21st century or at least the second half of the 20th), neither party has a plan. It's about jobs and about caressing the soul of your own followers with pet projects, better not reform or questioning.

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  • Machiavelli