How do I make delicious gumbo

Taste of Travel

Having just come back from a road trip through the US southern states, gumbo, the New Orleans classic and national dish of Louisiana, is now a perfect fit for the blog. This stew is thickened by a dark stoving (roux), which gives the gumbo its unmistakable smoky aroma.

 

Gumbo can tend to be prepared according to Creole or Cajun, the two dominant cuisines in Louisiana. For the Creole variant, the roux is usually only tanned light to medium brown, for the Cajun variant the stoving is often very dark, comparable to milk chocolate. The darker the roux, the more intense the taste and the lower the binding capacity of added liquids.
 
While Creole cuisine in Louisiana is often considered “city food”, Cajun is more rustic in its execution, more “country style”. Furthermore, the Cajun kitchen does not use tomatoes in most dishes; they are often used in the Creole kitchen. The gumbo at this point leans more towards Cajun.

What else is special about gumbo? Very often okra pods find their way into the stew - in addition to their unique taste, they serve to thicken the liquid. Okras are often difficult to find in Austria (in some Asian shops); if you leave them out or replace them with other vegetables, you may need a little more roux or should add a little less soup. There are also three types of vegetables: onions, celery and peppers (mostly green).

 

As far as the meat is concerned, everything is allowed: the addition of andouille, a smoked pork sausage, is almost mandatory. Any poultry or seafood can also often be found in a gumbo, beef is also used, but it takes much longer to cook. By the way, the fillet pieces are not used for gumbos - turkey neck or oxtail do it perfectly (I don't consider it quite as authentic in the recipe below).

 

When serving, gumbo is often sprinkled with chopped parsley or spring onion greens. A must is white rice as a side dish. This comes first on the plate, only then is it topped up with gumbo.

 

The gumbos I tasted in Lousiana were very different in terms of color, taste, ingredients and consistency. Some were very soupy, others a little creamier. The color palette ranged from orange, brownish to greenish. Most contained some kind of seafood, mostly shrimp or lobster (crawfish) and pieces of sausage. Rice (usually a small amount) was also found in the tried gumbos as an insert. The recipe below is therefore to be seen more as a suggestion and can of course be modified.

 

Step-by-step recipe for Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

Ingredients for a gumbo with chicken and sausage.

In the picture above the ingredients for a gumbo. The exact information can be found below in the recipe section.

Finely dice the vegetables.

Dice the onion, bell pepper, celery and garlic and set aside.

Cut the okra into slices.

Cut the okra pods into ½ cm thick slices.

Cut the sausage into slices and fry.

Cut the sausage into thin slices (approx. ½ cm thick) and fry in a pan with a little oil for 5 minutes over medium to high heat, then remove from the pan and set aside.

Roughly cut the chicken and season.

Cut the chicken into a few relatively large pieces. Mix the paprika, pepper and cayenne pepper and season the coarsely chopped meat with half of this spice mixture.

Fry the chicken.

Add a little oil to the pan in which the sausage was seared and fry the chicken on both sides for a total of 10 minutes until golden. Lift out of the pan and set aside.

Prepare the roux (stoving).

Prepare roux: A heavy-bottomed pan is best for this. Heat the oil in a clean pan (without any meat or vegetable residues) and slowly stir in the flour with a whisk. Brown the roux for around 30 minutes over a medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon.
 

Make sure that nothing burns (= bitter), otherwise you have to start over. The flour should be caramel-colored towards the end. If necessary, the preparation also works with a coated aluminum pan, but reaching a dark roux takes longer, in the aluminum pan shown here, 50 minutes.

Here I seared the vegetables directly in the roux - but I advise against it. Easier: fry the vegetables beforehand and only then mix them with the roux.

 

Now fry the onions, bell peppers, celery and okra in the roux for about 10 minutes over medium heat and steam the garlic and the rest of the spices for the last 2 minutes. However, this is a very sticky matter (see picture), so I advise against this variant.
 
It is easier to sear the vegetables in a separate pan (in which the sausage and chicken were seared) before preparing the roux (my recommendation).

Meanwhile prepare the hot soup and a large saucepan.

Mix the vegetables, roux and soup.

Combine the fried vegetables and roux in the large saucepan over medium heat. Then slowly stir around a ladle of hot soup into the Roux vegetable pot. As soon as the soup has combined well with the rest, stir in the next ladle.
 

Add around half a liter of soup in this way. Pour in the rest of the soup slowly while stirring. With 1 liter of soup, the dish is more liquid, for a thicker consistency use 1/8 liter less soup. If you haven't added okra (these help with thickening), also use a little less liquid.

Cook the sausage and chicken as well.

Add the sausage and chicken and simmer on a low heat for 40 minutes without a lid, stirring occasionally. The gumbo thickens a little, but not much.

Taste the gumbo.

Chilled overnight and warmed up the next day, the stew is thicker. Season to taste towards the end of the cooking time. Usually no salt needs to be added, as the soup (broth) is already salty enough.

Spread the rice in the middle of the plates and pour the gumbo on top. Good Appetite!

 

The gumbos I tasted in Lousiana were very different in terms of color, taste, ingredients and consistency. The recipe below is therefore to be seen more as a suggestion and can be modified. But three types of vegetables should not be missing: onions, celery and paprika (mostly green). As far as the meat is concerned, everything is allowed: the addition of andouille, a smoked pork sausage, is almost mandatory. Any poultry or seafood can also often be found in a gumbo, beef is also used, but it takes much longer to cook. By the way, the fillet pieces are not used for gumbos - turkey neck or oxtail do it perfectly (I don't consider it quite as authentic in the recipe below). When serving, gumbo is often sprinkled with chopped parsley or spring onion greens. A must is white rice as a side dish. This comes first on the plate, only then is it topped up with gumbo.

ingredients

  • 1 large onion (150 g)
  • 1 green pepper (200 g)
  • 2 stalks of celery (100 g)
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 200 g andouille (smoked pork sausage)
  • 400 g of chicken
  • 1 liter soup *
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 160 g okra pods (see tip)
  • Oil for frying
  • Parsley or spring onion greens as decoration (optional)
  • 2 ½ teaspoons paprika powder (if possible not sweet)
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
  • Possibly salt
  • 80 ml neutral vegetable oil, e.g. sunflower or peanut
  • 65 g flour

  • Cooked white rice for serving

    * In Austria, broth is often referred to as soup. I use vegetable broth for this recipe.

preparation

  1. Dice the onion, bell pepper, celery and garlic and set aside. Cut the okra into 1/2 cm thick slices.
  2. Cut the sausage into thin slices (about 1/2 cm thick) and fry in a pan with a little oil for 5 minutes over medium to high heat, then remove from the pan and set aside.
  3. Cut the chicken into a few relatively large pieces. Mix the paprika, pepper and cayenne pepper and season the coarsely chopped meat with half of this spice mixture.
  4. Add a little oil to the pan in which the sausage was seared and fry the chicken on both sides for a total of 10 minutes until golden. Lift out of the pan and set aside, leaving the oil in the pan to fry the vegetables.
  5. Fry the onion, bell pepper, celery and okra for about 10 minutes over medium heat, add the garlic and the rest of the spices for the last 2 minutes. Remove the vegetables from the pan and set aside.
  6. Prepare roux: A heavy-bottomed pan is best for this. Heat the oil in a clean pan (without any meat or vegetable residues) and slowly stir in the flour with a whisk. Brown the stoving for around 30 minutes over medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. Make sure that nothing burns (= bitter), otherwise you have to start over. The flour should be caramel-colored towards the end. If necessary, the preparation also works with a coated aluminum pan, but reaching a dark roux takes longer. Meanwhile prepare the hot soup and a large saucepan.
  7. Combine the fried vegetables and roux in the large saucepan over medium heat. Then slowly stir around a ladle of hot soup into the Roux vegetable pot. As soon as the soup has combined well with the rest, stir in the next ladle. Add around half a liter of soup in this way. Pour in the rest of the soup slowly while stirring (with 1 liter of soup the dish becomes more liquid, for a thicker consistency use 1/8 liter less soup).
  8. Add the sausage and chicken and simmer on a low heat for 40 minutes without a lid, stirring occasionally. The gumbo thickens a little, but not much. Chilled overnight and warmed up the next day, the stew is thicker. Season to taste towards the end of the cooking time. Usually no salt needs to be added, as the soup is salty enough.
  9. Spread the rice in the middle of the plates and pour the gumbo on top. Good Appetite!

tip

Very often okra pods find their way into a gumbo - in addition to their unique taste, they serve to thicken the liquid. However, okra pods are often difficult to find in Austria (in some Asian shops); if you leave them out or replace them with other vegetables, you may need a little more roux or should add a little less soup.

https://www.tasteoftravel.at/louisiana-gumbo/
Did you cook this dish? Your result could be shown here. Just send a picture to [email protected]flora Lousiana Gumbo took: "Thank you very much for the recipe and, above all, the step-by-step photos, which make it a lot easier to cook at home." jasmine: "Hello dear Ursula, thank you very much for your great gumbo recipe. We were in New Orleans in July and ate gumbo in the Gumboshop ... so delicious. Today we cooked it in the Dutch-Oven according to your recipe + a tomato. Instead of fillet we used chicken legs. We have okra pods at Edeka. So thank you, greetings to Austria from Northern Germany from Jasmin " Julia: "Hello Ursula! Thank you very much for your great recipe, it was super easy to cook and incredibly delicious! Best regards Julia"